Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

Hiroshima came across as a very green city and it was hard to imagine that the city was ruined, no, it was burnt to dust during the war. It then became well-known in all our history textbooks, each with a different story to tell. However at the Peace Memorial Museum, there was only one main point to convey and that was “War is bad and it causes misery to parties involved”. I might be over simplifying the war but that clearly was the message. There was no finger-pointing involved whatsoever.

A-Bomb Dome
A-Bomb Dome: The only structure left standing when the first atomic bomb landed in Hiroshima on 6th August 1945. It not only serves as a reminder of the atrocities committed in the war b y mankind; it also symbolises the hope for world peace.
The A-Bomb Dome has been enlisted as a World Heritage site since 1996.
The A-Bomb Dome has been enlisted as a World Heritage site since 1996.

For the Japanese students, visiting Hiroshima on a field trip is the norm. Peace Studies is part of their curriculum. We managed to catch a group of students reciting a pledge and offering their handmade origami paper cranes to show their support for world peace.

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Japanese students in Hiroshima pledging for world peace.
Paper crafts done by students exhibited in the park to promote peace.
Paper crafts done by students exhibited in the park to promote peace.

In the park, you will also come across the Children’s Peace Monument. That’s where the Japanese students usually gather to pledge for world peace.

Children's Peace Monument
Children’s Peace Monument

The monument was erected after the death of Sadako Sasaki, who was only 2 years old when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. She was an innocent victim of the war who suffered the deadly after effects of the dreadful nuclear weapon.

During her stay in the hospital in 1955, she aimed to fold 1000 paper cranes based on an ancient Japanese folklore that by doing so a wish would be granted. Unfortunately, she never got to complete all 1000 cranes herself. She died at the tender age of 12.

As we were walking through the park, we were approached by a Japanese primary school boy who wanted to interview us in English. He was on a field trip and had to interview foreigners on their views on Hiroshima and practise some English. In return, we were given two paper planes. Quite sweet, wasn’t he?

A token of appreciation from a Japanese school boy.
A token of appreciation from a Japanese school boy.

 

Directions to Children’s Peace Monument

Address:

Nakajima-cho Naka-ku Hiroshima City , Zip code 730-0811

Access:
[By public transportation]
City train No.2 bound for Hiroden-Miyajimaguchi or No.6 bound for Eba from JR Hiroshima Station and get off at “Genbaku dome-mae”station

Directions to A-Bomb Dome:

Address:
1-10 Otemachi Naka-ku Hiroshima City , Zip code 730-0051 
 

Access:

[By public transportation]

Approx. 15 min. by tram bound for Eba, Miyajimaguchi from JR Hiroshima Station and get off at “Genbaku Dome-mae”tram stop

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6 thoughts on “Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

  1. Pingback: Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum | Chronicles of Yoyo

  2. Pingback: Miyajima Island, Japan | Chronicles of Yoyo

  3. Pingback: Mt Fuji is now a World Heritage site! | Life in Frankfurt

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  5. Hiroshima is a city that has always amazed me. If you’re not ready to give up the city yet I recommend the movie ‘Hiroshima, mon amour.’ It’s in French and a little avante garde but it’s sooooo beautiful!

    Aryn
    Driftwood and Daydreams

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